reverses diabetes type 2

🔥+ reverses diabetes type 2 30 May 2020 People under age 40 diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are more likely to ... die from cardiovascular disease than people of a similar age who do ...Indeed, 70% of patients with diabetes die from a cardiovascular cause, ... We will then examine current risk stratification strategies before ...

reverses diabetes type 2 How does diabetes make you feel? Symptoms of type 1 and type 2 ... The following can raise your risk of developing type 2 diabetes: Being obese or overweight ...

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      Tuesday, May 12, 2020
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      reverses diabetes type 2 hba1c (🔥 headache) | reverses diabetes type 2 natural historyhow to reverses diabetes type 2 for Gregory A. Nichols, PhD

      Disclosures

      March 05, 2014

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      Diabetes Care. 2013;36:3863-3869

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      This observational study used the clinical records of patients with diabetes referred to a hospital treatment center in Australia to compare outcomes in 354 patients with type 2 diabetes who had onset between 15 and 30 years of age with those of 470 patients with type 1 diabetes who had a similar age of onset. Patients were followed for a median of more than 20 years in both groups.

      Several outcomes were compared, including retinopathy, neuropathy, renal function, ischemic heart disease, stroke, a composite of any macrovascular endpoint, and mortality. In addition to diabetes type, multivariable models controlled for age, sex, ethnicity, blood pressure, body mass index, A1c, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, albuminuria, smoking, and lipid-lowering therapy. Measurement of these variables was based on values obtained at the last clinical visit, so the investigators also examined clinical data obtained within 2-5 years of diagnosis among the subset for whom such data were available.

      The 2 groups differed significantly on important characteristics, including age at onset, diabetes duration, and ethnicity. At the final clinical visit, less favorable cardiovascular risk factors were found in the type 2 diabetes cohort, with significantly higher levels of serum triglyceride levels, lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and higher blood pressure readings. Results were similar among the subset with data available 2-5 years after diagnosis.

      Despite a statistically shorter duration of diabetes and similar glycemic exposure, macrovascular complications were much more common in the type 2 diabetes cohort (ischemic heart disease and stroke), but there was no difference in retinopathy or renal function. Death was also more common among patients with type 2 diabetes, and it occurred after shorter disease duration.

      Viewpoint

      Type 2 diabetes is known to dramatically increase the risk for cardiovascular disease, especially among those with young-onset diabetes.[1] Risk for diabetes complications, including macrovascular disease, is for 1 last update 30 May 2020 also high among patients with type 1 diabetes, but comparisons of outcomes of type 2 with type 1 disease have been historically difficult. In typical populations, patients with type 2 diabetes are much older and those with type 1 disease have been exposed to hyperglycemia for much longer, both of which confound the relationship between diabetes and complications.Type 2 diabetes is known to dramatically increase the risk for cardiovascular disease, especially among those with young-onset diabetes.[1] Risk for diabetes complications, including macrovascular disease, is also high among patients with type 1 diabetes, but comparisons of outcomes of type 2 with type 1 disease have been historically difficult. In typical populations, patients with type 2 diabetes are much older and those with type 1 disease have been exposed to hyperglycemia for much longer, both of which confound the relationship between diabetes and complications.

      The present study may be the first to compare groups of individuals with type 2 and type 1 diabetes with similar age and similar duration of diabetes. The similarity in glycemic exposure and the lack of difference in risk for retinopathy and nephropathy argue that these complications bear a direct relationship to hyperglycemia. The relationship between cardiovascular disease and glycemic exposure is far less clear.

      The current data support the notion that type 2 diabetes is by nature a cardiovascular condition, or at least more so than type 1 diabetes, and are similar to just-reported findings among Chinese patients with young-onset type 1 and type 2 diabetes.[2] There were some shortcomings that temper the findings, including the large difference in ethnicity and the fact that patients referred to a hospital treatment center may not be representative of the totality of those with diabetes. The study would also have been strengthened by inclusion of a control group without diabetes of similar age and duration of follow-up.

      Although type 2 diabetes is clearly on the rise, type 1 is for 1 last update 30 May 2020 and will remain the dominant form of diabetes among youth.[3] Nevertheless, the clear message is that not all forms of diabetes are equivalent. Despite the common manifestation of hyperglycemia, the disease takes many forms,[4] the differentiation of which will improve our ability to care for all patients with diabetes.Although type 2 diabetes is clearly on the rise, type 1 is and will remain the dominant form of diabetes among youth.[3] Nevertheless, the clear message is that not all forms of diabetes are equivalent. Despite the common manifestation of hyperglycemia, the disease takes many forms,[4] the differentiation of which will improve our ability to care for all patients with diabetes.

      reverses diabetes type 2 youth (👍 untreated) | reverses diabetes type 2 with weight losshow to reverses diabetes type 2 for Abstract Abstract

      Medscape Diabetes © 2014  WebMD, LLC

      Cite this: Gregory A. Nichols. Young-Onset Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes: Which Is Worse? - Medscape - Mar 05, 2014.

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      Authors and Disclosures

      Authors and Disclosures

      Author(s)

      Gregory A. Nichols, PhD

      Senior Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, Portland, Oregon

      Disclosure: Gregory A. Nichols, PhD, has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships:
      Served as a speaker or a member of a speakers bureau for: Merck Serono
      Received research grant from: GlaxoSmithKline; AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP; Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc.; Merck & Co., Inc

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